DOWRIES, GENDER VIOLENCE AND FAMILY IN AUSTRALIA

Professor Manjula Datta O'Connor
In-Conversation with Jess Hill

In the early 2010s a spate of domestic violence-related murders in the Victorian Indian community compelled psychiatrist Professor Manjula Datta O’Connor, to investigate the causes of patriarchal abuse in South Asian families.

As a practitioner with many decades experience in the field, Datta O’Connor questioned whether a better understanding of history and culture could help these communities implement measures to prevent family violence. But the most powerful lessons came from those she met through her practice-survivors of transnational abuse and of sexual and dowry exploitation. These women taught Datta O’Connor about human resilience and strength and the myriad ways women find the inner power to survive. These are the daughters of the goddess Durga, wielding the tools of history to produce meaningful change.

Manjula Datta O’Connor's book, Daughters of Durga, is an incisive investigation of domestic violence in South Asian communities, and the resilience of women in the face of adversity. She discusses her findings in conversation with Jess Hill.

Click HERE to purchase Manjula's book: Daughters of Durga from Matilda Bookshop's website and choose Hawke Centre Events Free SA Postage as the delivery option. They will then deliver or post a book to South Australian addresses at no additional cost. Alternatively, books will be for sale in the foyer on the night.

Presented by The Bob Hawke Prime Ministerial Centre

EVENT DETAILS

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Tuesday 12 July 2022, 6pm - 7.15pm

Allan Scott Auditorium, Hawke Building,
UniSA City West Campus,
55 North Terrace Adelaide MAP

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SPEAKERS

PROFESSOR MANJULA DATTA O’CONNOR
AUTHOR, CLINICAL PSYCHIATRIST AND RESEARCHER
Manjula Datta

Professor Manjula Datta O’Connor is a clinical psychiatrist and chairs the Royal Australian New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Family Violence Psychiatry Network. She is a clinician, researcher, advocate and works closely with community in prevention of family violence.

She has received Victorian Government Multicultural award of Excellence in Service Delivery to Migrant Women’s Mental Health. Her work has been recognised in Victorian and Federal Australian Parliament.

Manjula Datta O'Connor: Website

JESS HILL 
JOURNALIST

jess hill

Jess Hill is a Walkley award-winning journalist who specialises in reporting on coercive control and gendered violence. Prior to this, she was a Middle East correspondent, and worked as both a producer and reporter for various current affairs programs across the ABC. In 2019, she published her first book, See What You Made Me Do, about the phenomenon of domestic abuse in Australia.

It was awarded the 2020 Stella Prize, has been shortlisted for several others, including the Walkley Book Award and the Prime Minister’s Literary Award, and has been adapted into a television series for SBS. Recently, Jess has also produced an audio documentary series on coercive control called ‘The Trap’, and a Quarterly Essay on #MeToo in Australia, ‘The Reckoning’.

Jess Hill: Website
Twitter: @jessradio

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 PRESENTED BY
THE BOB HAWKE PRIME MINISTERIAL CENTRE

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While the views presented by speakers within The Bob Hawke Prime Ministerial Centre public program are their own and are not necessarily those of either the University of South Australia, or The Bob Hawke Prime Ministerial Centre, they are presented in the interest of open debate and discussion in the community and reflect our themes of: Strengthening our Democracy - Valuing our Diversity - Building our Future.

The copying and reproduction of any transcripts within The Bob Hawke Prime Ministerial Centre public program is strictly forbidden without prior arrangements.