Foundations for future wireless networks

Many of us have experienced the frustration of dealing with temperamental wireless communications devices but a new ITR project aims to make these experiences a thing of the past.

Many of us have experienced the frustration of dealing with temperamental wireless communications devices but a new project at the Institute of Telecommunications Research (ITR) aims to make these experiences a thing of the past.

Professor Alex Grant was recently awarded three years of federal funding for his project “Foundations for future wireless networks”.

Funded under the Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Projects scheme, Professor Grant’s research will focus on the delivery of more reliable and higher speed wireless broadband even to highly mobile users.

Professor Grant says future wireless networks will need to reliably deliver higher and higher data rates to increasingly mobile terminals, “Demand for faster data rates is being driven by the increasing use of mobile broadband on portable computing devices and by the increase of machine to machine applications.”

According to Professor Grant, network operators are faced with a tough challenge: to profitably transport increasing amounts of data through their wireless networks, while maintaining acceptable end user costs.

“Efficient use of scarce wireless spectrum is absolutely critical for operators to reduce costs and meet customer demand,” he says.

The scarcity of radio spectrum and the harsh nature of the mobile radio channel have hindered efforts to deliver better coverage to outdoor mobile users. Professor Grant’s research will deliver mathematical foundations and key technologies to work around these issues.

“The project will deliver the foundations for future wireless communications networks which will provide, reliable, low-cost, spectrum efficient communications to highly mobile users,” says Professor Grant.

Professor Alex Grant is Director of the Institute of Telecommunications Research at the University of South Australia. ARC Discovery Projects funding for the project totals more than $350,000 running from 2013 to 2015.

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